Career Help Coach

21Sep/120

Social Media and Coaching

Facilitated an interesting discussion this AM at the our monthly ASTD / MCDA Special Interest Group.  Today's topic related to how Social Media may be used IN a coaching environment /engagement. We began with a discussion of Personal Brand as described by Karl Speak / David McNally in their book “Be Your Own Brand” and with it, the realization that  a strong brand is supported by an  emotional connection to something or someone – a relationship.  Social Media is about relationships, and what is most  of coaching about?   Building positive relationships.

I mentioned I would share some of the articles / links we discussed, which  - if you use your powers of perception and conversion, might show you some unique ways of thinking about how your Personal Brand develops, is maintained or changes in different situations. And how Coaching, Teaching and Social media are now interacting – individually and in groups as a new venue for coaching.

There is NO particular order here, just links:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikaandersen/2012/04/07/warning-executives-avoid-social-media-at-your-peril/ (Executive Fear)

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203753704577255531558650636.html (Better Leadership Through Social Media)

http://mashable.com/2010/10/16/free-social-media-tools-for-teachers/ (For teachers, but aren’t coaches also “teachers”?)

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/industry/library/ind-educ-social-media1/index.html (More About Social Media in Education)

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/industry/library/ind-educ-social-media2/index.html (Ditto)

So -do you use Social Media in Coaching?  Tell us how.

Enough for now.
Write soon.

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is an Executive Coach, the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN.

10May/120

Logic Will . . .

"Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere."

- Albert Einstein

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN. He also chairs the Hennepin / Carver Workforce Investment Board - Minnesota's  largest.

9May/120

8 Qualities Employers Desire Most In Workers

How To Receive Retention Rewards For Top Performance

MEDIA CONTACT:
Thomas H. Bodin
Managing Partner
OI Partners-Organizational Innovations, Inc.
Fifty Eight Twenty One - East
Sunset Ridge Business Park
5821 Cedar Lake Road South
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 525-1475 ext. 400
tbodin@oipartners.net

Minneapolis – How can employees make sure they receive some of the retention perks and benefits many companies are beginning to award again to talented workers?

2 out of 3 employers (68%) have implemented programs in the past year to retain some of their most talented workers as turnover has increased at 30% of them, according to a survey by
OI Partners - Organizational Innovations, Inc., a global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm.

Companies are rewarding their most valued workers with raises in salaries and benefits, tuition reimbursement, and providing coaching and cash bonuses, depending on the level of the employee. For more information on retention survey, see http://bit.ly/IO3qMU

However, employers are awarding these benefits very selectively and are not even giving them to all top performers. “Workers need to demonstrate to their bosses that they are making critical contributions, have the qualities the company desires most, and that they have earned retention rewards,” said Tom Bodin, Managing Partner of OI Partners-Organizational Innovations.

Following are eight qualities employers value most in workers, according to the survey. “The degree to which workers exemplify these characteristics will strengthen their case for receiving retention perks,” Bodin added.

1. Being a team player (selected by 71% of surveyed companies): “Being part of a team has taken on a higher priority since many companies are still operating with leaner work forces and there is a greater need to accomplish goals through others," said Bodin.

2. Fully focused on satisfying customers (chosen by 68% of employers): “Employees should share complimentary letters and emails they receive with their bosses. Don’t assume that he or she already knows about your excellent customer service, but do it in a discreet way,” Bodin added.

3. Motivate and engage others in their jobs (chosen by 65% of companies): "In a challenging economy, employers appreciate when their employees reach out and keep each other motivated and involved in their work,” noted Bodin.

4. Success in achieving your “critical few objectives” (picked by 62% of companies): “These are the top one or two reasons why you were hired in the first place. Accomplishing these will count more than any other contributions you have made,” said Bodin.

5. Work smart (preferred by 60% of companies): This includes being up to date on the latest technology, keeping your skills and professional knowledge current, and continually searching for improvements in productivity, efficiency, and profitability.

6. Work hard (selected by 57% of employers): “Although companies for years have preferred working smart to working hard, they still want to see that you are dedicated to your job, put in an extra effort and volunteer to fill any gaps when necessary,” said Bodin.

7. Add value to the organization (chosen by 52% of employers.): Retention rewards are a recognition of your value. Track and document the specific ways you have added value to your employer.

8. Contribute to improving the bottom line (selected by 48% of businesses): There are various ways to do this, including helping to increase sales, cut costs, decrease turnover, and make useful suggestions and recommendations.

Workers seeking retention rewards should first determine how your company measures performance and discover which benchmarks and qualities count the most.

"Next, objectively assess whether you should be considered a top performer, if you have not already been so designated. If you feel you are already one, have a conversation with your boss and bolster your case with examples and quantifiable achievements. If you are not, discuss a developmental plan for you to pursue to become a star performer in the future,” Bodin added.

About OI Partners

OI Partners is a leading global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm that helps individuals find new careers and employers to improve the performance of their employees and organizations.

OI Partners specializes in career transition programs, executive coaching, leadership development, and other staffing solutions. The company was established in 1987 and is now located in 200 offices in 27 countries with close to 100 U.S. offices.

Please visit www.oipartners.net or call 800-232-5285.

About Organizational Innovations, Inc.

Founded in 1981, OI Partners - Organizational Innovations, Inc. is the Midwest regional OI Partners office and one of its original founding companies. Through its employees and alliances, Organizational Innovations delivers human resource, organizational, workforce, and individual development consulting coaching, training and recruitment services in four key talent management practice areas: Acquisition, Development, Alignment and Transition. Please visit www.organizational-innovations.com or call 952-525-1475.

9Apr/120

2 Out of 3 Companies Trying to Retain Talent

MEDIA CONTACT:
Thomas H. Bodin
Managing Partner
OI Partners-Organizational Innovations, Inc.
Fifty Eight Twenty One - East
Sunset Ridge Business Park
5821 Cedar Lake Road South
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 525-1475 ext. 400
tbodin@oipartners.net

Minneapolis – In a sign of an improving job market, 2 out of 3 employers are implementing programs to retain some of their most talented workers, according to a survey by OI Partners-Organizational Innovations, a global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm.

68% of employers have taken steps during the past year to retain some of their best executives, managers, future leaders, and those who work on the front lines. That is because turnover has already increased at 30% of surveyed companies and most are bracing for more employee exits in the coming year, according to the survey:

* 90% are concerned about losing high-potential employees
* 72% are worried about departing front-line workers (sales and service employees)
* 60% are apprehensive about middle managers leaving
* 45% are uneasy about senior-level executives exiting

“Most employers have initiated measures to hang on to their best talent. They realize if retention is a problem with a high unemployment rate, it will only get worse once more jobs become available if they don’t do something to entice employees to remain,” said Tom Bodin, Managing Partner of OI Partners-Organizational Innovations.

“Companies are most concerned about losing employees who they have designated as their future leaders and those who directly work with customers. Job opportunities have already increased for these levels of workers and competition for the best ones will become more fierce, as well as for those who manage them,” Bodin added.

The most difficult types of workers to retain are: operations and production (chosen by 30%), sales and marketing (27%), customer service (24%), accounting and finance (22%) and information services (20%).

Coaching programs, better compensation and benefits and tuition reimbursement are among the top retention methods employers are using to retain management employees and future leaders.

“Providing coaching to employees in how to become better managers is as important a signal of investing in their career development as are salary and benefit increases,” said Bodin.

Employers are using primarily non-financial methods to retain those who work on the front lines, including selecting them more carefully, giving departing employees exit interviews, and providing better orientation and training.

The methods companies are using to retain employees are:

- High-potential workers: The top ways that companies are trying to retain high-potential employees are through better compensation and benefits (43% of respondents), coaching programs (40%), mentoring programs (38%) and tuition reimbursement (37%).

- Middle managers: The most popular retention methods companies are using for middle managers are coaching programs (35%), tuition reimbursement (30%), better compensation and benefits (30%), and flexible hours and schedules (24%).

- Senior-level executives: Coaching programs are the top way companies are trying to retain senior-level executives (37%), followed by stock options (32%), profit-sharing (27%), better compensation and benefits (24%), and retention bonuses (18%).

- Front-line workers: 50% of employers said they are selecting front-line workers more carefully as the top retention method. Other popular retention methods are: giving exit interviews (48%), better orientation and training (35%), tuition reimbursement (34%), and better compensation and benefits (26%).

OI Partners received responses from 174 organizations with locations throughout North America.

About OI Partners

OI Partners is a leading global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm that helps individuals find new careers and employers to improve the performance of their employees and organizations.

OI Partners specializes in career transition programs, executive coaching, leadership development, and other staffing solutions. The company was established in 1987 and is now located in 200 offices in 27 countries with close to 100 U.S. offices.

Please visit www.oipartners.net or call 800-232-5285.

About Organizational Innovations, Inc.

Founded in 1981, OI Partners - Organizational Innovations, Inc. is the Midwest regional OI Partners office and one of its original founding companies. Through its employees and alliances, Organizational Innovations delivers human resource, organizational, workforce, and individual development consulting coaching, training and recruitment services in four key talent management practice areas: Acquisition, Development, Alignment and Transition. Please visit www.organizational-innovations.com or call
952-525-1475.

21Mar/120

5 Things Your Company Needs to Do Today in Order to Stay Competitive

by Patty Prosser, OI Partners - Career Consultants Indianapolis

When thinking about what organizations need to do to effectively compete in today’s challenging marketplace, I can’t help but turn to that sage advice offered by Jim Collins in his books “Built to Last” and “Good to Great.” Great companies really do know how to turn crisis into opportunity by focusing on two key things 1) staying committed to enduring values and 2) making certain they have the best talent.

And, although we are still operating in uncertain times, there is a silver lining called “opportunity.” There are many “opportunities” savvy companies can capitalize on to stay competitive and ensure their future success.

So, here are 5 things your company may want to consider now, to stay in the game:

1. Communicate often and be consistent about your company’s values. You must reinforce and be clear about your organization’s principles and core vales that explain why you do what you do.

2. Set a clear direction that your employees can get behind. You must be consistent in your messaging so employees are clear about where the organization is going and allow them to have a role in shaping the direction it will take.

3. Focus on your customers. Be a good student to your customers’ business by consistently staying up to date on where their business is going and what they need to succeed. Become that trusted advisor they can turn to for solutions to help them get there.

4. Make certain your key leaders are doing the right things right. Invest in growing the skills and competencies of your top leadership. Provide leadership executive coaching andleadership development initiatives that can equip your leaders to not only execute what they need to do today, but in the years to come- and set an expectation of continuous improvement.

5. Stay agile. Know that whatever you are doing today won’t be what you need to be doing tomorrow. Pay attention and be a student of your own business.

No one knows for certain what the weeks and months ahead will bring, but one thing is certain—having the right mix of strategic vision, processes and leadership talent will give you the advantage your company needs to successfully compete. So, I ask you:

-          How well do you really know what’s going on in the businesses of your customers?

-          Are the leaders you have in place today prepared to take advantage of the opportunities the market will bring?

My Thanks to Patty Prosser for this contribution.  So what do you think? What steps  are you taking? What's working? What's not?

Got an Opinion?  Please share it.

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is an Executive Coach, the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN.  He also chairs the Hennepin / Carver Workforce Investment Board -representing Minnesota's largest Workforce Service Area

7Mar/120

The 10 Biggest Mistakes When Leaving Your Job

The 10 Biggest Mistakes When Leaving Your Job

MEDIA CONTACT:
Thomas H. Bodin
Managing Partner
OI Partners-Organizational Innovations, Inc.
Fifty Eight Twenty One - East
Sunset Ridge Business Park
5821 Cedar Lake Road South
Minneapolis, MN 55416
(952) 525-1475 ext. 400
tbodin@oipartners.net

Minneapolis – March 7, 2012 – As the number of job openings and workers quitting increases, people may be susceptible to committing one or more of the 10 Biggest Mistakes When Leaving Your Job, according to OI Partners-Organizational Innovations, a global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm.

The number of people leaving their jobs is growing as job openings increase:

• Quits Up 20%: The number of people voluntarily leaving their jobs is 20 percent higher than two years ago, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (1.92 million workers quit their jobs in December 2011 compared with 1.6 million in December 2009.)

• Job Openings Up 42%: The number of available jobs is 42 percent higher than two years ago (December 2009), according to the BLS. (There were 3.38 million job openings in December 2011 compared with 2.38 million in December 2009.)

“People spend much more time trying to find a new job than they do planning a proper exit,” said Tom Bodin, Managing Partner of OI Partners-Organizational Innovations. “However, with pent-up anxiety building over the past few years due to the poor job market, people need to be cautious about leaving abruptly, badly, or not doing as much as they can to ensure a smooth transition.”

"You can never be sure how secure any job is. It's important that you leave positive professional impressions with every employer so you can receive a good reference and keep the door open to returning if ever appropriate," added Bodin.

Here are the 10 Biggest Mistakes People Make When Leaving A Job:

1. Slighting your boss. Make sure your immediate supervisor is the first one you notify about leaving. "Do not tell co-workers before informing your boss. Do this in person – not by email or phone – and in private. Do not be overly happy or joyous about leaving, but express some regret and communicate how much you enjoyed working there," said Bodin.

2. Burning bridges: Do not leave on a sour note and be bitter or angry about actual or perceived slights such as being passed over for promotion or inadequately compensated. "This may come back to haunt you. It’s also not a time to tell supervisors and co-workers 'what you think of them,'” noted Bodin.

3. Not giving sufficient notice. Two weeks’ notice is customary for staff positions. Managers and executives may need to give more notice to ensure a smooth handoff. An alternative is to ask how much notice they would prefer and see if this can be worked out with your new employer.

4. Not offering to train or recruit your replacement. If your replacement has been selected before you leave, offer to train him or her. If no successor has been chosen, volunteer to use your knowledge of the job to help choose a replacement.

5. Failure to thank employer: Thank your employer for the great career opportunity. "After departing, write a thank you note stating how much you enjoyed working for the company and your manager, what you learned and how much you value the experience," said Bodin.

6. Not participating in an exit interview: "Participate in an exit interview especially if you want a good reference in the future. Treat the exit interview as seriously as a hiring interview and focus on the benefits the new position presents for you and your career – and not the shortcomings of the job you are leaving or anyone working there," stated Bodin.

7. Not making a clean break: Leave professionally and do not take proprietary information with you."It is your reputation that will still stay with your ex employer. Assure them you will not be soliciting other employees to leave," added Bodin.

8. Leaving unfinished work. Be sure you complete all of the work that can reasonably be expected within your time remaining. Do not slack off or start arriving late and leaving early.

9. Unwilling to answer questions. Volunteer to answer questions related to the job you are leaving for a short period after departing.

10. Not staying in touch with your boss and co-workers after you leave. "Keep in contact with them to maintain your career network and bolster getting a good reference. Offer to serve as a reference and networking source for them," Bodin said.

About OI Partners

OI Partners is a leading global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm that helps individuals find new careers and employers to improve the performance of their employees and organizations.

OI Partners specializes in career transition programs, executive coaching, leadership development, and other staffing solutions. The company was established in 1987 and is now located in 200 offices in 27 countries with close to 100 U.S. offices.

Please visit www.oipartners.net or call 800-232-5285.

About Organizational Innovations, Inc.

Founded in 1981, OI Partners - Organizational Innovations, Inc. is the Midwest regional OI Partners office and one of its original founding companies. Through its employees and alliances, Organizational Innovations delivers human resource, organizational, workforce, and individual development consulting coaching, training and recruitment services in four key talent management practice areas: Acquisition, Development, Alignment and Transition.

Please visit www.organizational-innovations.com or call 952-525-1475.

15Nov/110

Get The Skills – Get The Jobs

Yesterday I spent spent the afternoon with the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development & Workforce Development folks. Discussed the looming skill shortage and steps to solve.

A key point of discussion centered around the real shortage of skilled workers.   In business circles  it seems  to be common knowledge that  here are jobs to be filled - but for many  - companies are unable to identify and attract people with the unique technical skills required to do the job.  The problem is -  all too often -  there is not a practical way to teach the skills required in an affordable or timely way to meet the immediate need.

The education and government bureaucratic systems recognize the problem but aren't nimble enough to help the both the job seekers to  learn whats 's needed - now.  Stories of unfilled quality manufacturing  postions are common because the required specialized  training is complicated and not available locally.

So a question worthy of more conversation is:   Should a comprehensive Workforce and Economic Development "System" take some libertiies and  focus - for example -  on specialized or unique market niches and adjust (bend) the rules to provide industry / company specific government training dollars to bring the necessary training expertise here - and get people hired?

Got an Opinion?

Please share it.

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is an Executive Coach, the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN.  He also chairs the Hennepin / Carver Workforce Investment Board -representing Minnesota's largest Workforce Service Area.

1Nov/110

Live This Day . . .

"Live this day as though it is the last day of your life, because some day it will be"

- Steve Jobs

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN. He also chairs the Hennepin / Carver Workforce Investment Board, serving  Minnesota's  largest Workforce Service Area.

11Oct/110

Luck Is . . .

"Luck is the residue of intention."

- Robert B. Parker

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN. He also chairs the Hennepin / Carver Workforce Investment Board - Minnesota's  largest.

7Sep/110

Humility Is . . .

"Humility is a strange thing. The moment you think you've got it, you've lost it"

Rishika Jain

Tom Bodin
The Career Help Coach

Tom is the Managing Partner / President of OI Partners / Organizational Innovations, Inc. and founder of CareerSummit.com, – both headquartered in Minneapolis, MN. He also chairs the Hennepin / Carver Workforce Investment Board - Minnesota's  largest.